If your kid loves music and even plays it, it is time to expand their love to the bedroom and provide it with a matching mood decoration. Be inspired by these music-themed bedroom decor ideas for kids!

Giving children and adolescents room to dream of a healthier future

Learning how to design a music room will help you get the most out of the room while keeping peace with your neighbors and other household members.
Decide how the room will be used -- whether for practices, performances, or recordings and create your design from there.
Whether you’d a prefer space that is dark and dramatic, our design experts can provide you with whatever aesthetic gets you in a creative mindset the most.

10 Ways You Might Be Sabotaging Your Classroom Management


Why does classroom management seem to come easily to others while you are still struggling?  Why don’t the brilliant plans you read about work for you?  Why are you so stinkin’ exhausted at the end of every school day?  You might just be sabotaging your classroom management plan and not realize it.


Here are a few things to think about if you are struggling with classroom management.

Jumping in Without a Plan

Remember that old saying “Look before you leap!”?  That is good advice for classroom management too.  If you are starting your school year or semester without a plan for managing your classroom, you will end up struggling with it the entire time. 
Think about classroom procedures, how you will redirect students that are off-task, what attention getting signal you will use and what you’ll do when a student is out of control.  Write it down.  Thinking about it is a great start but write it down so that you have a reminder for your students and for yourself.


You may be sabotaging your classroom management and not even know it!  Learn how to figure out a plan that works with teacher tested techniques. Preschool, middle school, high school?  These strategies work for controlling transitions, talking and can set your substitutes up for success too.Fred Jones, author of Tools for Teaching, says that teachers with the best run classrooms spend most of the first two weeks teaching procedures and routines.  My favorite quote: "Do it right or do it all year long."

Being...


Why does classroom management seem to come easily to others while you are still struggling?  Why don’t the brilliant plans you read about work for you?  Why are you so stinkin’ exhausted at the end of every school day?  You might just be sabotaging your classroom management plan and not realize it.


Here are a few things to think about if you are struggling with classroom management.

Jumping in Without a Plan

Remember that old saying “Look before you leap!”?  That is good advice for classroom management too.  If you are starting your school year or semester without a plan for managing your classroom, you will end up struggling with it the entire time. 
Think about classroom procedures, how you will redirect students that are off-task, what attention getting signal you will use and what you’ll do when a student is out of control.  Write it down.  Thinking about it is a great start but write it down so that you have a reminder for your students and for yourself.


You may be sabotaging your classroom management and not even know it!  Learn how to figure out a plan that works with teacher tested techniques. Preschool, middle school, high school?  These strategies work for controlling transitions, talking and can set your substitutes up for success too.Fred Jones, author of Tools for Teaching, says that teachers with the best run classrooms spend most of the first two weeks teaching procedures and routines.  My favorite quote: "Do it right or do it all year long."

Being Inconsistent

It is hard for students to know what behavior is acceptable if you aren’t consistent with what you are telling them.  If it is not okay for students to interrupt your lesson to ask to go to the restroom, but someone does, and you let them go, smile and then continue your lesson, your students will assume that it is okay.  


When I first started teaching being consistent was exhausting.  Why?  Because I had rules for every single thing and I was running around like a crazy woman trying to enforce them.  After much reflection (and too many headaches) I realized that I just didn’t care about some things and I could let them go.  For example, I don’t mind if students are chatting during workstations or center time.  If they are working and completing their tasks, I WANT them to have conversations about that learning.  I don’t care if they get up and get a Kleenex without permission or if they sharpen their pencil when it needs it as long as they aren’t disruptive. I used to have a rule for all of those things and I didn't really want to enforce them.


Now I have three classroom rules and my life is easier: Respect yourself.  Respect others.  Respect the property of all.  This allows me to be more relaxed AND more consistent.


You may be sabotaging your classroom management and not even know it!  Learn how to figure out a plan that works with teacher tested techniques. Preschool, middle school, high school?  These strategies work for controlling transitions, talking and can set your substitutes up for success too.Trying to Be Like the Teacher Down the Hall

A great mentor can make you a better teacher, but what works for them may not work for you.  Don’t get bogged down by trying to imitate every great idea you see someone else do.  Find what works for you.



Laughing a Little Too Much

I like to laugh, and I like kids.  I especially like funny kids.  Sometimes I find it difficult not to smile or laugh when kids say something to get us off track.  Laughing too much or smiling and chasing those off-topic rabbits can derail a lesson.  Use quick phrases to keep it light to refocus your group before you have to hear twenty funny cat stories.  I use statements like “Great story!  Let’s get back to Beethoven now.”  or “Thanks for making me smile.  You know what else makes me smile? Music theory!”


Not Taking it to the Hall

Guilty.  On occasion I have corrected a student in public rather than taking it to the hall.  This can be embarrassing for the student and is not a good way to prevent this behavior from happening again.  It can build resentment toward you and others. Always try to correct a student in a private way if possible.  Speak quietly to them at their seat or call them to your desk.  Ask them to step outside of your classroom and chat with them there if possible.


When directing large groups or rehearsing intensely I will pause and say “David, please see me after class.  I need to talk to you.”  Although this is a signal to David to stop the behavior I’ve noticed, it doesn’t let others know what’s going on unless they noticed it too.  I often have students stay after class for positive reinforcement, treats from the goody box or personal messages of encouragement.


Being Front and Center

You may be sabotaging your classroom management and not even know it!  Learn how to figure out a plan that works with teacher tested techniques. Preschool, middle school, high school?  These strategies work for controlling transitions, talking and can set your substitutes up for success too.Stop it.  Move around the room.  Always be a few feet away.  Even as music teachers we can step away from the music stand and be closer to our students as they work and perform.  This stops misbehaviors before they start and gives you a chance to redirect students and help them individually.


Getting Emotional…In the Bad Way

Music is such a passionate thing.  Sometimes it gives me goosebumps or brings a tear to my eye.  Students are passionate too.  Sometimes they give me goosebumps or bring tears to my eyes.  Sometimes they make me want to stomp and scream!  Your students know when you are frustrated or upset.  Don’t let it get out of hand.  Take a break.  Sip some water.  Breathe.

Be honest with them.  Plenty of times I have a heart to heart with them and say “I really want to try this activity again because it is a great way to learn *insert whatever skill we are working on* but it is too loud and too chaotic.  I don’t feel like everyone can learn and I’m getting frustrated.  Let’s talk about what we can do to make it better this time.” It works more often than not and gives me a chance to sit down and use a quiet, calming voice.

Decorating a Classroom without the Students in Mind

I see my students once a week for 50 minutes.  They are in my room less time a week than they are in the restrooms!  So for many years I decorated for myself.  I used colors and themes that I liked because I was the only person that had to be in the room all day long every day.


When I started decorating with my students in mind I created rooms that were bright and colorful, but not dripping with text everywhere.  Some students are overwhelmed and will spend their entire class time reading your walls.  Keep it simple and useful.


When I thought more about what my students needed in my classroom I added flexible seating options for centers, an easy access point for getting supplies and positive messages for them to read and reread on the walls.  If you are interested in learning more about setting up your room you might enjoy this blog post:  Questions to Ponder as You Set Up Your Music Room


You may be sabotaging your classroom management and not even know it!  Learn how to figure out a plan that works with teacher tested techniques. Preschool, middle school, high school?  These strategies work for controlling transitions, talking and can set your substitutes up for success too.Making it Personal

When kids are angry, embarrassed, scared or frustrated they can say some pretty mean things.  It is a symptom.  Something is going on.  Maybe it is something you can see: They aren’t understanding what you are working on, they are being picked on or they have a physical need that isn’t being met.  Yes, they could be hangry or uncomfortable.  Maybe it is something you can’t see like the big fight mom and dad had last night.  Don’t take it so personal.  Be professional.  Move on.


This isn't to say that you should allow them to be disrespectful.  Speak to them privately if needed.  Then move on.

Not Making it Personal

I know I just said not to take things so personal, but this tip is for your relationship with the kiddos.  Get to know them.  Smile at them.  Ask questions.  Help them make connections.  As a specialist I feel like this one is hard.  I see students for such a short time each week and there often isn’t time to chat as we cram in curricular and performance goals.  
To combat this I go out of my way to chat with them before school in the hall, at lunch or recess or any other duty I may be assigned.  Students need to know you care in and out of the classroom.  This helps classroom management issues disappear.  Seek out that attention stealing student and start a conversation.  Compliment that shy student when you see them in the morning.  Make connections.


If you are a new teacher or a veteran teacher looking to up their game, you might enjoy this blog post too: Advice for the New Music Teacher.   You can do this.

 If you liked these ideas for classroom management PIN them for later!
You may be sabotaging your classroom management and not even know it!  Learn how to figure out a plan that works with teacher tested techniques. Preschool, middle school, high school?  These strategies work for controlling transitions, talking and can set your substitutes up for success too.



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